1. womensweardaily:

Yiqing Yin Couture Spring 2014
Photo by Dominique Maître

    womensweardaily:

    Yiqing Yin Couture Spring 2014

    Photo by Dominique Maître

  2. Kleinfeld Bridal Window on 20th Street between 8th and 7th Ave’s in NYC

  3. womensweardaily:

Lanvin Sets Plans for 125th Anniversary
Courtesy Photo
From early February, lanvin.com will host a new section titled Lanvin History, featuring previously unseen photographs, archive video footage and original gouaches by founder Jeanne Lanvin.  For More

    womensweardaily:

    Lanvin Sets Plans for 125th Anniversary

    Courtesy Photo

    From early February, lanvin.com will host a new section titled Lanvin History, featuring previously unseen photographs, archive video footage and original gouaches by founder Jeanne Lanvin.  For More

  4. mmja251995:

 mmja251995:

Gisele Bündchen in Lanvin, photographed by Giampaolo Sgura for Vogue Brazil December 2013.

    mmja251995:

     mmja251995:

    Gisele Bündchen in Lanvin, photographed by Giampaolo Sgura for Vogue Brazil December 2013.

  5. womensweardaily:


Maxime Simoens RTW Spring 2014
Photo by Giovanni Giannoni

    womensweardaily:

    Maxime Simoens RTW Spring 2014

    Photo by Giovanni Giannoni

  6. The Vines of the Mind Fashion Show, July 19th, 2013

    (First, I’d like to apologize for the lateness of this posting. But new jobs and a new apartment have given me little free time. Secondly, the title, Vines of the Mind, was taken from a poem by a member of GEMS (Girls Educational & Mentoring Services) which is where most proceeds from the show were being given to.)

    I got to know two of the three producers of this fashion show about a month ago thanks to The Fashion Potential and they invited me to come out to La Maison D’Art in Harlem for their event. I arrived very early and was greeted with the usual flurry of activitiy that surrounds these shows. But I was also greeted by Jocelyn Pizarro who immediately remembered me. Jocelyn was the co-producer/dresser and stylist for the models behind executive producer and jewelry designer Dana Shirley. These ladies did a wonderful job for first timers showing their own skills/collection and producing their first show. Ah, I remember my first show… We only had one line, these girls had 8, plus two entertainers and some surprises on their end… I’d give the show a 2.5/4 star rating.

    La Maison D’Art is a tiny gallery on West 132nd street with less than a handful of pieces in about a handful of space, but I love the love and effort put into art. My only concern is that there seemed to have been a garden, a spacious garden, that the show could have taken place in because we were hot without proper AC, and the production space upstairs was even hotter, we were told. The runway was minimal, with some silk flowers lining the sides of it on the floor and a rather low garden archway, with silk flower vines weaving in and out of it. I admired that they kept overhead to a minimum so as much as possible could go back to the charity!

    While waiting for the show to begin I spoke to a couple of girls I hadn’t met before. One was Ms. Simone S. who works at an American Apparel in the city. Her particular store just celebrated its ninth year in business! Woot-woot! I love American Apparel on multiple levels for their designs and their no sweatshop practices and of course that they try to make everything in America. The second lady I spoke to was one of the designers showing her collection, Vinniece Dufresne of NYBC (Not Your Boyfriend’s Closet). We bonded over TV shows like Game of Thrones and Orange is the New Black and she told me that her collection is all about the tom girl who likes wearing her guy’s things, but making it more feminine. I really liked that idea and immediately checked out her online boutique. It was definitely clothing I would wear. [You mean if you were a girl?] Yeah, we’ll go with that.

    So on to the main events! The catwalk…

    Desi Amour

    A Jewelry designer who made everything herself and preferred the airy look of tulle with her earrings and necklaces.

    Define Me Designs

    This brand was projecting for Summer 2014. They saw cinched waists, lots of black, sequins and knits! Very eclectic… even the swimwear presented used the sequins and knits!

    Kash Kow

    An established brand with clothes being worn by people in the entertainment industry already, Kash Kow focused on the classic American sportswear, the T-shirt and graphics. Although they do cut the Ts to be airable, probably for dancing in. The most interesting design were denim vests with accents I would have liked to study more closely but alas the models were rather rapid and the runway short.

    NYBC

    Fresh, flirty girls (models) in classic flowing summer white bounced down the runway with energy and seeming to enjoy the clothes they were wearing. Models today are usually treated as mannequins. This designer gave her clothes an interesting life allowing the model to be a bit of herself.

    Shaine Errington Collections

    A Carribean/Jamaican designer with an interesting silhouette: she tightened the torso, but allowed the rest of the garments to blossom out. Whether this was to allow for movement or whether she had some ulterior motive I cannot say, but with the juxtaposition of Jackson Pollock-esque prints I feel the clothes were more urban than regal, not so bourgeois as to mirror the power styles of the 80s dresses.

    6XII

    An autobiographical romp in yellow and blue cocktail dresses and swimwear.

    Dollhouse

    As a boutique drawing from its own shelves it provided more of a stylist’s eye to the runway than the designers could give showing only their own creations. I saw summer-y bustiers, floral overalls and hot pants unite for some sweet-sexy modern day girl on the street. If they had only had lollipops or ice cream it would have completed the looks.

    Human Element Squared

    Seemingly the youngest designer, he had many ideas and put them all on the runway. Such design choices as contrasting zipper colors, halter tops, plaid vests, and deconstruction reigned over the final show.

    Once again, I must thank these ladies for letting me attend their show and apologize for getting this posting out so late.

  7. I recently had the pleasure of reading Alexander McQueen’s biography by Judith Watt, the head of Fashion History at Central Saint Martins. Watt never claims any connection to McQueen’s inner circle, but they ran in the same circles one can deduce from the college they were both members of and her mention of first seeing McQueen rather early on in his career when he was judging a fashion contest and had to defend his choice.
When I began reading I was almost hoping for something truly in-depth, almost a first person narrative through the eyes of one of McQueen’s friends, but I did not get this and am the better for it. As a historian, Watt can separate any feelings she might have towards McQueen and/or his work. She does admit that she admires him but does not let this override the facts that he had many flaws in his character, though it does soften them. Also, because McQueen was such a private person I don’t think anyone would want to reveal his entire personal life to the public simply to let him be in death as he was in life.
The set up for the book was easily contrived and centers around McQueen’s growth in the fashion industry. First, taking on his life before business when just the rumblings of what he was to become was showing through, to his apprenticeship and work for other designers, on into Saint Martins, and finally onto his runways.
My best friend is an event planner and I told him to read this book because of his interest in producing fashion shows. The book goes into some detail (though not great) over the set up of each of McQueen’s memorable shows, not to mention the reasons behind each and the clothes therein.
The books greatest strength lies in the excerpts from those McQueen interacted with directly: designers, teachers, stylists, friends, and gives more layers to his story to show that it was indeed his attitude and work ethic that would get him as far as it did. He was naturally talented, yes, but ultimately he was passionate and that served him more in all his years than anything.

    I recently had the pleasure of reading Alexander McQueen’s biography by Judith Watt, the head of Fashion History at Central Saint Martins. Watt never claims any connection to McQueen’s inner circle, but they ran in the same circles one can deduce from the college they were both members of and her mention of first seeing McQueen rather early on in his career when he was judging a fashion contest and had to defend his choice.

    When I began reading I was almost hoping for something truly in-depth, almost a first person narrative through the eyes of one of McQueen’s friends, but I did not get this and am the better for it. As a historian, Watt can separate any feelings she might have towards McQueen and/or his work. She does admit that she admires him but does not let this override the facts that he had many flaws in his character, though it does soften them. Also, because McQueen was such a private person I don’t think anyone would want to reveal his entire personal life to the public simply to let him be in death as he was in life.

    The set up for the book was easily contrived and centers around McQueen’s growth in the fashion industry. First, taking on his life before business when just the rumblings of what he was to become was showing through, to his apprenticeship and work for other designers, on into Saint Martins, and finally onto his runways.

    My best friend is an event planner and I told him to read this book because of his interest in producing fashion shows. The book goes into some detail (though not great) over the set up of each of McQueen’s memorable shows, not to mention the reasons behind each and the clothes therein.

    The books greatest strength lies in the excerpts from those McQueen interacted with directly: designers, teachers, stylists, friends, and gives more layers to his story to show that it was indeed his attitude and work ethic that would get him as far as it did. He was naturally talented, yes, but ultimately he was passionate and that served him more in all his years than anything.

  8. So, I went to my first real New York fashion related event today with The Fashion Potential.
*mild applause*
Thank you. It was very eye-opening. I’ve always been the one touting the wonders of art for art’s sake, but the speaker, Samantha Patterson, was quite direct on the subject of the life of a designer peddling their own label. She went from concept and history of her line to production and the everyday business in under two hours. And while it took her two hours to tell us her story she stressed the actual time if really takes her to accomplish what must be done.
She said that 90% of her time is business and only 10% creating, and she interjected that she is an artist. She went to school to sew and make clothes for the art, but if she doesn’t build up a good business model then no one is going to take her seriously and no one is going to buy her clothes. Well, they might, but it would be sporadic.
She creates the designs and patterns then sends those off to be cut and stitched by others according to her specifications. Now she does prefer American companies (Fair Trade! Woot-woot!), but beyond that she lets a production manager handle the fabric supplier, the cutters, seamsters, packaging, etc. Not all producers will do all of those things, but she needs hers to because even with that management she still has to make calls every day to these service providers to ensure that her designs are coming out as she envisioned them.
Now with myself coming from documentaries about old Paris fashion houses where everything was done in house, it is almost startling to hear about this new form of production. And because I am interested so in couture and the art I was worried for my own future in fashion. Samantha did assure me however that I could still do couture and put my hand to machine to create garments, but to ask for an appropriate price from customers after. And we talked about creating a couture and pret-a-porter line which is where I would want to start and where she is hoping to arrive soon.
Ah, so much information, but I am glad I received it. In moving forward with this knowledge I can decide better which professional routes I will take!
Samantha also praised me for being a Fashion Historian and made me realize that a skill like that would be useful to modern designers. So even if I do not become an independent designer I could always offer my services in developing modern twists on older styles! Or why not do both and have the best of both worlds? ;-)

    So, I went to my first real New York fashion related event today with The Fashion Potential.

    *mild applause*

    Thank you. It was very eye-opening. I’ve always been the one touting the wonders of art for art’s sake, but the speaker, Samantha Patterson, was quite direct on the subject of the life of a designer peddling their own label. She went from concept and history of her line to production and the everyday business in under two hours. And while it took her two hours to tell us her story she stressed the actual time if really takes her to accomplish what must be done.

    She said that 90% of her time is business and only 10% creating, and she interjected that she is an artist. She went to school to sew and make clothes for the art, but if she doesn’t build up a good business model then no one is going to take her seriously and no one is going to buy her clothes. Well, they might, but it would be sporadic.

    She creates the designs and patterns then sends those off to be cut and stitched by others according to her specifications. Now she does prefer American companies (Fair Trade! Woot-woot!), but beyond that she lets a production manager handle the fabric supplier, the cutters, seamsters, packaging, etc. Not all producers will do all of those things, but she needs hers to because even with that management she still has to make calls every day to these service providers to ensure that her designs are coming out as she envisioned them.

    Now with myself coming from documentaries about old Paris fashion houses where everything was done in house, it is almost startling to hear about this new form of production. And because I am interested so in couture and the art I was worried for my own future in fashion. Samantha did assure me however that I could still do couture and put my hand to machine to create garments, but to ask for an appropriate price from customers after. And we talked about creating a couture and pret-a-porter line which is where I would want to start and where she is hoping to arrive soon.

    Ah, so much information, but I am glad I received it. In moving forward with this knowledge I can decide better which professional routes I will take!

    Samantha also praised me for being a Fashion Historian and made me realize that a skill like that would be useful to modern designers. So even if I do not become an independent designer I could always offer my services in developing modern twists on older styles! Or why not do both and have the best of both worlds? ;-)

  9. beautilation:

    Eshu, Alexander McQueen F/W 2000

    This was McQueen’s first collection that was shown in Paris (instead of London). It was inspired by the pre-colonial Yoruba tribe of West Africa, mixing tribal details with luxurious fabrics to emphasize the raw power of clothes. The models wore heavy steel piercings and their hairlines were dusted with yellow powder. The clothes were mud-spattered, glass-beaded and shredded, the materials being a variety of leathers, horsehair, and cotton.

    Actually it was largely mixing tribal fabric techniques and luxurious fabrics to emphasize the juxtaposition of a culture’s historical sacredness with other privileged culture’s impression of it and theft of it through history. McQueen was all about taking part in cultural appropriation but in a way that he was heavily critiquing it, often visualizing how strange it was to try and take one culture out of one part of the world and make it into a typical Western luxurious fantasy. He wanted to bring out the beauty in other cultures that had been mistreated (often by Western civilization) by fusing the bizarre body constraints, body sexualization, and ladies garments of the Western world with the artistic, natural, savage beauty that he related to and found in the very cultures which we repressed and trivialized. Keep in mind that cultural appropriation was not yet a conversational topic when McQueen was doing this. Before him, there was foreign-inspired fashion, “oriental” and “ethnic” collections. There was no fusion of a political conversation speaking out against the problems with this in the fashion world before McQueen. And you thought it was all just frivolous fashion.

  10. Charleston Fashion Week Day 6: We’ve got this!

    So sorry for the late blogging. A friend came into town last night and we stayed up late, yadda-yadda, but let me tell you about the events prior to his arrival…

    Read More

  11. Charleston Fashion Week Day 5: I Got All Access, What!?

    I hit ground zero and the first thing my bosses tell me to do is to hand make some credentials for myself. I know all the team leaders anyway and they would be okay with me being wherever I need to be because I WORK and I GET THINGS TAKEN CARE OF. I actually really enjoy management and production, and I’m not afraid to get dirty with the rest of my team, I wouldn’t want to work for someone who thought a job was beneath them and delegated it to me so I don’t want to be that person myself.

    Read More

  12. toryburch:

E is for Elisa Nalin
The Paris-based stylist and brand consultant who doesn’t let a little thing like weather stop her from wearing vibrant colors and prints.
Read more…

    toryburch:

    E is for Elisa Nalin

    The Paris-based stylist and brand consultant who doesn’t let a little thing like weather stop her from wearing vibrant colors and prints.

    Read more…

About me

My heroes include Lady Gaga, Alexander McQueen, Marcia Tucker, Diana Vreeland, Dr. Sam Howell (my art history professor at FMU), Bill Cunningham, and many others. These people have helped to shape my ideas about style, art, and fashion; creating a mélange which draws upon every period, from antiquity to modern day pop culture. Here and now I will attempt to add my voice to all the others and in doing so I begin training my eye and mind to be more discerning and expressive on the subject of fashion as art and vice-versa art as fashion. Fashion is a way of living, therefore art is a way of life too.

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